CASEWORK | INTERIOR DESIGN
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Laurelhurst

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Searching for their forever home, our newly retired clients, purchased this 1917 Laurelhurst fixer as a way to transition from busy careers as scientists in Indianapolis to a combined home in Portland. They were drawn to the home’s high ceilings, large windows and traditional details but disliked the inefficient kitchen, small master bath and dark rooms.

The sitting room had the ideal indoor outdoor connection to the back yard through glass french doors that were centered on the room. But the centered doors made it impossible for furniture to fit without blocking the door. The skylights were existing but the window above the sectional was not. Basically, the room was big but furniture wouldn’t fit without blocking something. We moved the doors to create a better line of sight from the dining room out to the yard and make room for a more comfortable seating area complete with an L-shaped sectional.

 
 
 
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Keywords


Together

Comfortable

Tailored

 
 
 
 

WAS THE NOOK PRESENT WHEN THE HOME WAS PURCHASED?

The nook was previously a rarely used exterior door and storage cabinet. We removed the door and replaced it with a window and built in bench to create a space to dine informally or relax while someone else is working in the kitchen.

 
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CUSTOM CABINETRY

Casey and team worked closely with the clients to take their traditional style to a more personal level and also honor the history of the home. The existing dining room cabinet leaded glass panels were saved and incorporated into a new custom wine cabinet. The trim, casing and moulding details were matched to the existing original details of the home.

 
 
 
 
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Why get rid of original cabinets from the 1900’s?

While the bones of the home were great, the interior layout was awkward. The kitchen was updated in a previous remodel but incredibly inefficient. Casework incorporated a new kitchen peninsula for added counter space and storage and to create a way to connect with someone while working in the kitchen. One of the smallest moves with the biggest impact in the kitchen was removing the unusable fireplace chase. This made for a more squared off room and equal counter space on each side of the range.

 
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WHAT WAS THE BIGGEST transformation DURING THIS REMODEL?

The upstairs bathroom is the biggest transformation of the home. Once a pedestal sink with no storage and tub only bathroom, Casework expanded the footprint of the bath and added a full walk in shower as well as vanity with storage. 


 
 
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Credits

Thanks to Daryll, Adrian and the team at Hammer & Hand for the attention to detail and communication it takes to transform a home from the early 1900s. Rockwood for the gorgeous cabinetry, wine storage details and working with us to save the original leaded glass from the dining room cabinet. To the design team, Casey Keasler, Miranda Williams and Haley Voght. Photos by Carly Diaz and Lana Boelter. Video by Casework’s own, Lana Boelter.